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For whatever reason you've found yourself falling out of love, here's how the experts suggest you find your way back in."Long-term couples don't touch enough," says Wendy Walsh, clinical psychologist and founder of Ask ALove Guru.com, a site that matches relationship therapists with potential clients.

"She gets to see him being alive and excited, and that's really the best way to see your partner." Once you've got your individual passions figured out, it's also helpful to have something you can both pour your love and attention into."The couples who last the longest tend to be the ones who create something together," says Walsh."When we touch—especially skin-to-skin—we get a little rush of the brain chemicals that help trigger those loving feelings." Think about how often you and your partner actually share physical contact on a daily basis.If it's just a quick peck on the lips before and after work, make an effort to step up your game, says Walsh.There are lots of great things about being in a long-term relationship: Research shows that happy couples, in many ways, have better health and overall wellbeing than their single or divorced peers.

After all, a loving partner can offer companionship, comfort, and physical and emotional support when you need it.Often that something is children, she adds, but it can also be a business, a charity, or even a home-remodeling project."Look for something you are both interested in—not just something you're into and you think your spouse can get on board with," she says.Sleeping skin-to-skin, whether it's full-on spooning or even just touching toes, can have relationship benefits, too.In fact, a 2014 survey presented at the Edinburgh International Science Festival found that couples who slept the closest to each other reported having more relationship satisfaction."A weekend overnight in a new place, or a vacation without children; anything with the element of surprise." Falling in love with someone isn't all about what happens when you're together; a lot of it has to do with what you're doing on your own, says Solomon.