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" Denise Dunn, 36, easily lists a couple dozen one right after the other, and those are just in Durham.

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At the time there was a club in Raleigh on Glenwood down by the Rialto that was just for women.

That was the first lesbian club I ever went to and even though it was small and kind of a dive, I loved it and I loved being there and included in the community.

"I think the biggest disappointment for me has been to find out that after all that time away, attitudes about gays had not changed that much--particularly within the gay community itself.

Far too many are still in the closet, especially among the older gays.

I have wonderful neighbors, our kids play together, and it just feels like home. "I was born and spent my early years in North Carolina.

It's a choice: I can move to New York with a larger gay male community and pay

It's a choice: I can move to New York with a larger gay male community and pay $1,500 for a studio apartment, or live here and own a nice house in a quiet neighborhood where I can raise my son in a loving and safe environment." Rivera agrees. Life on a North Carolina foothills farm is very isolating and provincial, and while growing up I realized that there was a big world out there that I wanted to explore, to see other places and meet other people," says David Kerl, 55, of Raleigh."As a Jewish gay man, I find it difficult to meet someone here who shares my interests and perspective on the world and life. A., San Francisco, New York City, Atlanta and Israel--major metropolitan areas.I moved back to North Carolina in 1998 not because of its gay community per se, but because of its community," he adds."After more than five years in Seattle--and two years in New York before that--the first few years of living here were a wrenching adjustment, especially in terms of my gay identity and community involvement," says Lamazares, 33. "Where else can I live practically out in the country--on a wooded acre of land where I can almost see the Milky Way on clear dark nights, where it's quiet and the crime rate is very low--and still be a five-minute drive from a bohemian meet-n-greet like Weaver Street Market in Carrboro? It has its charms." Beckie Moriello, 26, of Raleigh, thought she would hate it here. My plan was to come for two years and run away as soon as it was over." But she didn't, and nobody is more surprised than she is."Not only did I stay and get a job afterwards, but I could see myself living here permanently. Likely someone you meet knows someone you already know." Despite the considerable conservative population around us, the Triangle has become a surprisingly attractive place for gay men and lesbians.Some move here for jobs, some for a less hectic way of life, some for a lower cost of living. Some are moving back, years after running to a big city to come out, to be close to aging family members. "I was in the military when I came out and glad to be so close to Raleigh," says Anissa Litwin, 35, of Chapel Hill.

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It's a choice: I can move to New York with a larger gay male community and pay $1,500 for a studio apartment, or live here and own a nice house in a quiet neighborhood where I can raise my son in a loving and safe environment." Rivera agrees. Life on a North Carolina foothills farm is very isolating and provincial, and while growing up I realized that there was a big world out there that I wanted to explore, to see other places and meet other people," says David Kerl, 55, of Raleigh.

"As a Jewish gay man, I find it difficult to meet someone here who shares my interests and perspective on the world and life. A., San Francisco, New York City, Atlanta and Israel--major metropolitan areas.

I moved back to North Carolina in 1998 not because of its gay community per se, but because of its community," he adds.

"After more than five years in Seattle--and two years in New York before that--the first few years of living here were a wrenching adjustment, especially in terms of my gay identity and community involvement," says Lamazares, 33. "Where else can I live practically out in the country--on a wooded acre of land where I can almost see the Milky Way on clear dark nights, where it's quiet and the crime rate is very low--and still be a five-minute drive from a bohemian meet-n-greet like Weaver Street Market in Carrboro? It has its charms." Beckie Moriello, 26, of Raleigh, thought she would hate it here. My plan was to come for two years and run away as soon as it was over." But she didn't, and nobody is more surprised than she is.

"Not only did I stay and get a job afterwards, but I could see myself living here permanently. Likely someone you meet knows someone you already know." Despite the considerable conservative population around us, the Triangle has become a surprisingly attractive place for gay men and lesbians.

Some move here for jobs, some for a less hectic way of life, some for a lower cost of living. Some are moving back, years after running to a big city to come out, to be close to aging family members. "I was in the military when I came out and glad to be so close to Raleigh," says Anissa Litwin, 35, of Chapel Hill.

,500 for a studio apartment, or live here and own a nice house in a quiet neighborhood where I can raise my son in a loving and safe environment." Rivera agrees. Life on a North Carolina foothills farm is very isolating and provincial, and while growing up I realized that there was a big world out there that I wanted to explore, to see other places and meet other people," says David Kerl, 55, of Raleigh."As a Jewish gay man, I find it difficult to meet someone here who shares my interests and perspective on the world and life. A., San Francisco, New York City, Atlanta and Israel--major metropolitan areas.I moved back to North Carolina in 1998 not because of its gay community per se, but because of its community," he adds."After more than five years in Seattle--and two years in New York before that--the first few years of living here were a wrenching adjustment, especially in terms of my gay identity and community involvement," says Lamazares, 33. "Where else can I live practically out in the country--on a wooded acre of land where I can almost see the Milky Way on clear dark nights, where it's quiet and the crime rate is very low--and still be a five-minute drive from a bohemian meet-n-greet like Weaver Street Market in Carrboro? It has its charms." Beckie Moriello, 26, of Raleigh, thought she would hate it here. My plan was to come for two years and run away as soon as it was over." But she didn't, and nobody is more surprised than she is."Not only did I stay and get a job afterwards, but I could see myself living here permanently. Likely someone you meet knows someone you already know." Despite the considerable conservative population around us, the Triangle has become a surprisingly attractive place for gay men and lesbians.Some move here for jobs, some for a less hectic way of life, some for a lower cost of living. Some are moving back, years after running to a big city to come out, to be close to aging family members. "I was in the military when I came out and glad to be so close to Raleigh," says Anissa Litwin, 35, of Chapel Hill.