Biggest losers 2016 competitors dating medellin dating agencies

People can (and rightly will) get bogged down in arguments on whether it should go from Wimbledon to Clapham Junction via Tooting, via Balham, via somewhere else or directly without an intermediate station, but these are mere details and hardly matter at the macro level.

In the same way, a few years ago, one could have made a case that Crossrail itself was as much about London maintaining its prominent position in the world and its markets as it was about providing a better transport system.

We will also ignore the details of why a Bakerloo line extension to Hextable, Wilmington, Coney Hall, Hammersmith, Birkbeck, City Hall and a host of other equally bizarre locations was rejected and attempt to find what the report is really trying to say.

Here, that means the Bakerloo Line Extension has to be mostly self-financing through much-needed housing development.

Once one accepts this criterion then a lot of other decisions fall into place.

and her story today doesn’t match the story she told 11 years ago!!

One week after the "census fail" there are reports some Australians are still trying, and failing, to complete the census online.

To that end we now look in detail at the latest consultation report on proposals to extend the Bakerloo line.

If “Death by Powerpoint” was a late 20th century phenomenon then “Death by Consultation Responses” is a candidate for its 21st century successor.

The question has been posed many times: surely we can’t afford to finance both a Bakerloo Line Extension and Crossrail 2 at the same time?

The answer to this is made clear in the report and, perhaps unsurprisingly, it follows one of our Editor John Bull’s favourite maxims – you build the railway you can pay for, not the best one you can plan.

Again, this was something its detractors (such as Simon Jenkins in 2009) failed to grasp when suggesting how the money could be better spent on other transport schemes that wouldn’t have sent out the same message to international investors. As with Crossrail 2, the rationale for extending the Bakerloo line is largely about housing – something that we have been trying to emphasise for some time and something that this latest consultation report makes abundantly clear.

A failure to grasp this will result in a failure to fully understand why the decisions made so far have been made.

Had we have done so, one of the messages we would have got across is Crossrail 2 is not just about transport. Crossrail 2 is largely about housing in the South East of England.