Cyber sex in china webcam who is barbie dating

It is, however, the vague terms used to outlaw cybersex and the update of the Revised Penal Code to criminalise libel communication via computers or "any other similar means which may be devised in the future", that is of most concern.Like Acta and Ceta, the act is seeking to control and curtail certain cyber behaviour through criminalisation -- unlike Acta or Ceta, it is targeting nearly any cyber activity it can think of, referencing them with some of the vaguest terminology imaginable and thus leaving potential innocent parties open to investigation and action.

Some of the webcams that have vulnerabilities that would allow them to be attacked in such a way are already being recalled after last week’s attack.But even if every device that was used in the attack was recalled, the threat will still exist – technologists have repeatedly warned about insecure and unsafe internet of things devices, and people are likely to continue making them.You might well have been responsible for one of the biggest-ever attacks on the internet last week. A huge network of webcams and other internet of things devices is being built that can be used as perhaps the biggest cyberweapon ever created.And those people who own the devices probably don’t even know that they’re infected with the malicious code that allows them to be used that way.The Department of Homeland Security last week issued a warning about attacks from the Internet of Things, following the release of the code for Mirai.

Attacking a large domain name service provider like Dyn can create massive disruptions because such firms are responsible for forwarding large volumes of internet traffic.

It suggests mutually willing participants, not just those coerced to take part in profitable applications, could be considered criminally liable.

The terms "for favour and consideration" are also vague -- it is not directly talking about partaking in cybersex for money, and so could be used to target ordinary people with no involvement in the sex trade.

While "Unsolicited Commercial Communications" are given three get out of jail free clauses that moderate the enforcement of the law, the libel entry, along with the cybersex one, has none.

It simply adds it to the roster of other, traditional means of communications that could result in criminal punishment.

"These are nasty attacks, some of the hardest to protect against." Drew and Nixon both said that the makers of connected devices needed to do far more to make sure that the gadgets can be updated after security flaws are discovered.